Windows 8 Consumer Preview

Category: windows metro apps preview

Question

SIRKEEN75 on Tue, 21 Feb 2012 05:29:11


 Here's my thing; I'm an avid Windows user, however, I have experience with many other platforms. I'm not as inept as some of our 30-50 year IT veterans but I can swing in there with the best of them. I have one comment and one question for the community: Comment: Windows 8 (although still in development stage) is very stable and very intricate in design- I'd say damn well thought out and developed so stop bashing it until you've got the finished product! Question: I'd like to know if there will be a way to upgrade my Developer Preview to the new Consumer Preview like an average upgrade patch? That is all... o(._.)o

                

Replies

Paul Adare on Tue, 21 Feb 2012 05:47:15


On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 05:29:11 +0000, SIRKEEN75 wrote:

?Here's my thing; I'm an avid Windows user, however, I have experience with many other platforms. I'm not as inept as some of our 30-50 year IT veterans but I can?swing in there with the best of them. I have?one?comment and one question for the community: Comment: Windows 8 (although still in development stage) is very stable and very intricate in design- I'd say damn well thought out and developed so stop bashing it until you've got the finished product! Question: I'd like to know if there will be a way to upgrade my Developer Preview to the new Consumer Preview like?an average upgrade patch? That is all... o(._.)o

To begin with, characterizing those of us with more experience than you
have as being inept is not a great way to start in this forum and is rude
and uncalled for.

As far as an upgrade goes, no, there won't be a patch you can apply to your
current install to bring it up to the CP. If you're so skillful, and the
rest of us so inept, then you should know that this has never been the case
when moving from one release of a pre-release Microsoft OS to another.
Based on my years of experience dealing with pre-release OS testing is that
while you may be able to upgrade from the DP to the CP, this will not be
recommended due to the significant changes between the two. In fact, again
based on my experience, I wouldn't be surprised to find that an upgrade is
specifically blocked.

Whatever happens when the CP is released the best advice when moving from
one build to another is to always perform a clean install. This ensures
that bugs the exist in the current build are not carried over to the new
build and that you are testing and providing feedback from a known,
supported baseline.

Then again, since I've been testing Microsoft operating systems and
products since the Windows NT days, what do I know since I'm part of the
group you consider to be inept.


Paul Adare
MVP - Forefront Identity Manager
http://www.identit.ca
Save energy:  Drive a smaller shell.

SIRKEEN75 on Tue, 21 Feb 2012 14:02:28


 Ok, first and foremost; I never meant to offend anyone with that statement- so here's my rebuttal. I am a current student which means that I am still learning and so that would constitute why I made a comment like that; I was only being rhetorical guy... lighten up. I only threw that out there for the people posting negative comments about simple obvious "seem to be caveats" of the OS (it's a Beta.. duh!). I have much respect for guys of your stature and I admire your knowledge in the field. I have previously tested for Microsoft in the past as well but I have stepped away from the software field at intervals in my life so I may be a little hairy on some of the protocol practiced when it comes to the issue of pre-beta testing. So in short, didn't mean any harm buddy just inquiring. I just wasn't sure if things had changed in the Microsoft world- as you know well enough they do quite often in this field! Looking forward to learning a lot from you guy's in the future and thanks for your response... o(._.)o

DarienHawk67 on Wed, 22 Feb 2012 01:21:00


Being an "avid Windows user," you surly know that with ANY MSFT pre-release product (CTP, Dev Preview, Beta, RC), each iteration requires a clean install.  During this pre-release phase, MSFT gathers all kinds of metrics that are automatically sent back to Redmond.  This is because all pre-release builds are checked builds that have additional debugging code installed and that Customer Improvement Program (CIP) is automatically enabled.

Requiring clean installs means that MSFT gets good, sanitized, information.  If they allowed upgrades of pre-release products, then the information sent back would be corrupt since a system, such as this Dev Preview, can have multiple issues--some internal, a lot user generated.  During any kind of testing phase, you always want to have a baseline start.  You can pretty much bet there will no supported (someone will try and have serious issues which they will try to get fixed here) upgrade path to the Consumer Preview.


SIRKEEN75 on Wed, 22 Feb 2012 02:45:36


Being an "avid Windows user," you surly know that with ANY MSFT pre-release product (CTP, Dev Preview, Beta, RC), each iteration requires a clean install.  During this pre-release phase, MSFT gathers all kinds of metrics that are automatically sent back to Redmond.  This is because all pre-release builds are checked builds that have additional debugging code installed and that Customer Improvement Program (CIP) is automatically enabled.

Requiring clean installs means that MSFT gets good, sanitized, information.  If they allowed upgrades of pre-release products, then the information sent back would be corrupt since a system, such as this Dev Preview, can have multiple issues--some internal, a lot user generated.  During any kind of testing phase, you always want to have a baseline start.  You can pretty much bet there will no supported (someone will try and have serious issues which they will try to get fixed here) upgrade path to the Consumer Preview.



Ok, although I am an avid windows user, I have not Beta tested every single operating system put out but I do understand most of the sequence. I repeat, the reason I asked that question is because there has been a lot of changes within Microsoft Corporation and I was unsure how they were going to conduct this particular project this time. I have had my hands into a lot of things pertaining to the technical field in my life and I tend to miss a few things here and there but for the most part I am a techy and love to stay involved in this field. As of the topic of clean installs, I am fully aware of this procedure but I guess I haven't tested enough Windows operating systems to see the difference in a patched Beta- sorry. 

xosys on Thu, 23 Feb 2012 02:15:13


Sounds like you still have some learning to do. Good luck.

Rahul Begins on Thu, 23 Feb 2012 19:37:15


Why don't u apply a common sense that if it were so u would be able to use Windows Developer Preview till March 16, 2013 with all the features of Windows Consumer Preview & a Windows Consumer Preview using person wouldn't be able to do so because of short expiration of consumer preview.. so what u r guessing is simply false.

So first apply common sense then learn to behave in a professional way rather expressing your emotions in the forum.

BRANDON CROWE on Wed, 29 Feb 2012 04:27:17


Why don't you apply some puctuation?    .  ,  -  ?  !    They are wonderful things that separate a sentence.

SIRKEEN75 on Wed, 29 Feb 2012 05:40:38


Why don't you apply some puctuation?    .  ,  -  ?  !    They are wonderful things that separate a sentence.

You took the words right out of my mouth Brandon!!! o(._.)o  I originally joined this community to help out and learn as well; apparently, some jerks just keep trying to give me a hard time... it's probably the ones who don't know much to begin with and feel insecure about themselves so they lash out at guys like me.

We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o